Charley Scarborough’s Salsa Recipe

 

I learned to make this while living in England.  Having moved there from Arizona, I craved the taste of the Southwest, but couldn’t find edible salsa.  So I emailed Charley and he emailed back and here it is. 

 

1 large sweet onion- chopped

1 jalapeno pepper -  minced

1 bunch of fresh cilantro – scissored

1 large can of whole tomatoes with juice (scissor these too)

Juice of two limes

Tablespoon of white vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste

 

This is fabulous on eggs and works well with chips.  You can also add black beans and corn.

 

No-cook Pasta Sauce, quite possibly adulterated from a recipe in Nora Ephron’s wonderful novel, Heartburn, which contains a Vile Husband of a different sort. 

 

¼ cup of olive oil

8 cloves of garlic cut in half

Cup of fresh basil (scissored) or ¼ of dried

Large can whole tomatoes with juice

Salt and pepper to taste

Red pepper flakes if you like.

(Toss with one pound of cooked penne or bowties or linguine)

 

Leave sauce at room temperature for at least 4 hours, or in fridge overnight.  Do not cook the sauce as the basil will get ruined.    As you cook your pasta, find the garlic halves (there should be 16) and remove them.  Once the pasta’s cooked (try taking it out a minute before the directions say...for al dente) you’ll mix the sauce in with it and serve immediately.  I always serve with fresh Romano or Parmesan but it’s great with Feta too.

 

And for the Ritual Dressing of the Lettuce

 

Place salad in large bowl.

Sprinkle the leaves with balsamic vinegar until they are coated.

Pour salt on your palm into an ant-hill the size of a dime and distribute across the top of the vinegar-soaked leaves.  Do the same with about half as much black pepper and twice as much dried basil.  Sprinkle with a small amount of sugar (about a teaspon).

Drizzle nice olive oil over all of this and then toss.  Taste.  Add salt if necessary. 

(I use about half as much vinegar as oil.)  The Italian man who taught me this said that spices adhere to vinegar, that’s why you put them on before the oil.